Aloha!

Welcome to Hawaii Homegrown!

    Building local, sustainable food communities on Hawai'i Island

  • Find others for buying, selling, sharing, and learning | Farmers Markets
  • Empower yourself and your community to become food self-reliant | Reports
  • Learn about events, resources, happenings, and locally grown food | Events
  • Keep yourself informed through our monthly newsletter | Newsletter archive

    It's all free and abundant, so dig in!


Breadfruit

Breadfruit

SUPERFRUIT OF THE GODS
Talking Story

Talking Story

A PARADISE OF ARTICLES
Resources

Resources

GET YOUR GROW ON
About

About

AMAZING THINGS
Revitalizing Breadfruit

Revitalizing Breadfruit

"The Ho'oulu ka 'Ulu Project.“

Ho'oulu ka 'Ulu is a project to revitalize 'ulu (breadfruit) as an attractive, delicious, nutritious, abundant, affordable, and culturally appropriate food which addresses Hawai'i's food security issues. It is well known that Hawai'i imports about 90% of its food, making it one of the most food insecure states in the nation. Additionally, since the economic downturn of 2008, many families lack access to affordable and nutritious food. We believe that breadfruit is a key to solving Hawaii's food security problems.

Read more

Chocolate—From Bean to Bar Workshop

Leon Rosner and Una Greenaway (on left) at workshop
Leon Rosner and Una Greenaway (on left) guide the small-scale chocolate making process at their farm.
On March 18-19, 2010, Una Greenaway and Leon Rosner of Kuaiwi Farm hosted a two-session chocolate making workshop. For a minimal price they provided easy-to-follow demonstrations and instructions for making chocolate from scratch. With eight participants, everyone had a chance for a hands-on experience at each step in the process. The process began with cracking and winnowing the cacao beans and ended with pouring tempered chocolate into delicate molds. The smell of chocolate was intoxicating and at some points it seemed like magic was taking place in the kitchen.
Continue Reading

Print Email

Mala'ai: A model for Hawai'i school gardens—The 5th-year Anniversary Celebration

On March 3rd, 2010, Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School, the inspirational model of the school garden movement on Hawai'i Island, held its five-year anniversary celebration. At the mid-day event, as cloud-shrouded Mauna Kea stood sentinel against a bright blue sky, the trade winds stormed across her slopes towards Waimea. Nearly two hundred young and old gathered in the wind by the garden, equally divided between student-gardeners and community supporters to hear Kumu Pua Case present the opening pule.
Waimea Middle School students
Waimea Middle School students walk to Mala'ai for the 5th anniversary celebration.

In the very moving introduction that followed, Kumu Case -- who is also the Ike Hawai'i teacher for Waimea Middle School -- declared  that, “Five years ago we pledged to create out of this land a learning tool and experience that would help make our children healthy and our school community whole – and we did.”

Continue Reading

Print Email

Culturing the Micro-Flora of the Body and the Soil

_S7B3478CElevitchA
Left to right: Vincent Mina, Theresa Vernon, Paul Hepperly, Jerry Brunetti, and Michael Melendrez.

On January 23-24, 2010, Maui Aloha Aina Association presented a conference on "Culturing the Micro-Flora of the Body and the Soil" at Waiaha Farm in Holualoa, North Kona. Four experts presented at the conference, assembled from Acres USA and the Westin A Price conference held each year on the mainland.

Continue Reading

Print Email

Eat Locally Grown Day

North Kohala Report
Our first North Kohala "Eat Locally Grown Day" was on Saturday, January 16, 2010. This was one of the initiatives that came out of the North Kohala Food Forum. Restaurant owners Joan Channon (Bamboo), Karen Rosen (Kohala Coffee Mill), Peter Pomeranze (Sushi Rock) and farmer Tom Baldwin (Uluwehi Farms) wanted to feature more North Kohala-grown food in our local restaurants to build community consciousness about our healthy, locally produced foods and to create new connections with local farmers.
Continue Reading

Print Email

Honey bees—Specialty Crop Profile

_MG_5875CElevitchA
Honey bees can provide multiple products, in addition to essential pollination services.

There are several bee species that are cultivated for their products and pollination services but the most widely used species is the honey bee, Apis mellifera. In Hawai‘i and in the Pacific, there is a great potential for beekeeping at all scales. Rural areas in the Pacific are ideal for supporting beekeeping activities because of the abundant year round floral sources that can provide enough honey for family and/or community needs with the possibility of additional income from the selling surplus honey.

Continue Reading

Print Email

Hamakua Alive!

Pa'auilo, Hamakua

Started in October 2007 with 11 participants, the Third Annual Hamakua Alive! Festival held in Pa'auilo Elementary and Secondary School on October 24, 2009 was a huge success. The event has grown in leaps and bounds with over 40 booths this year and the largest ever number of entries in the cooking contest.

Continue Reading

Print Email

More Articles ...