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Breadfruit Tree Sales 2011

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“Regarding food, if a man plants 10 (breadfruit) trees in his life he would completely fulfill his duty to his own as well as future generations…” Sir Joseph Banks, 1769

Breadfruit Festival 2011 participants purchased 300 breadfruit trees.
Breadfruit Festival 2011 participants purchased 300 breadfruit trees.

Nearly 300 trees were purchased at Breadfruit Festival 2011 on September 24, 2011. As breadfruit trees are capable of producing 100-300 lb or more of fruit annually, and they have a productive lifespan of 60+ years, the trees purchased at the festival could provide 900-2700 tons of breadfruit during their lifetime.

You can still purchase trees from our Breadfruit Festival 2011 nursery partners, Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden and Kona Ulu nursery.

Planting breadfruit trees will:

  • Increase your ability to feed your family and community by providing abundant breadfruit year after year for decades.
  • Help restore this beautiful plant in Hawaiian landscapes, beautifying Hawai'i today and for future generations.

'Ma'afala' variety

'Ma'afala' is a favorite fruit for it's nutty flavor and firm texture. Tissue-cultured trees can produce fruit in a mere 3 years.
'Ma'afala' is a favorite fruit for it's nutty flavor and firm texture. Tissue-cultured trees can produce fruit in a mere 3 years.

These trees are multiplied through tissue-culture, giving fast-growing, healthy, well-branched trees that can begin bearing fruit within 3 years. 'Ma'afala' trees tend to be shorter and more compact than other varieties. The small fruits (2 lb) are convenient for a family-size meal. The white flesh is solid and dense and has a firm texture when cooked. The fruiting season has been up to 9 months in some locations in Hawai'i. As an indication of the commercial potential of 'Ma'afala', the Samoa Ministry of Agriculture began exporting fresh fruit to New Zealand in 2003. [Breadfruit.org reference]

'Hawaiian' variety ('ulu)

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A proven abundant producer in Hawai'i, you can still see remnants of old groves of Hawaiian 'ulu in North and South Kona.

From trees descending from the ancient Hawaiian kalu 'ulu (traditional Kona breadfruit region), these trees are propagated by the expert staff at Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden (Breadfruit Festival location). The white flesh is dense and has a firm texture when cooked. It can be used in many dishes including 'ulu salad, baked 'ulu with coconut milk, and curries. This variety is easily made into 'ulu poi. It has good potential for commercial processing of chips and other products. [Breadfruit.org reference]

Purchase trees

You can still purchase trees from our Breadfruit Festival 2011 nursery partners, Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden and Kona Ulu nursery.

'Ma'afala' trees in one gallon pots at Kona 'Ulu nursery ready for outplanting.
'Ma'afala' trees in one gallon pots at Kona Ulu nursery ready for outplanting.

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