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    Building local, sustainable food communities on Hawai'i Island

  • Find others for buying, selling, sharing, and learning | Farmers Markets
  • Empower yourself and your community to become food self-reliant | Reports
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Hyperlocal frozen dessert by OnoPops

on Friday, 24 January 2014 00:00.

Ono PopsOnoPops produces a variety of flavors depending on local ingredient availabilty.

In 2010 brothers Josh Lanthier-Welch and Joe Welch established OnoPops, whose flagship product line consists of ice pops made from local and organic ingredients. Profoundly inspired by the patela tradition of ice and milk-based frozen pops in Latin America, the brothers based their product line on a marriage of the Mexican patela and Hawaiian regional cuisine. The result is an endless range of creative flavor combinations that changes continually based on which ingredients are available from local sources.

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From tree to nib: making a small batch of cacao

on Thursday, 23 January 2014 11:42.

cacaopodsandnibsCacao pods and seeds with pulp. One of the many lovely things about Hawai’i is we can grow our own cacao or find the pods fresh for sale. Although making chocolate is pretty complex and involves some expensive equipment (Champion juicer, Cuisinart or melanger, molds), you can get a great chocolatey result from just using the nibs. Here is how to select a handful of fresh cacao pods and then ferment, dry, roast, and winnow them to create bitter yet delicious and nutritious nibs, and a few ways to use those nibs.

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Hawai'i Island Goat Dairy

on Thursday, 26 December 2013 11:36.

HIGoatFarmCheesecave2Hawai'i Island Goat Farm cheeses.The Hawai'i Island Goat Dairy is a small goat farm and dairy that produces all handmade "Farmstead Goat Cheeses" the old fashioned way.

The farm is located in Ahualoa, above the Honoka'a area at about 1800 feet elevation, nestled into the flanks of Mauna Kea on a beautiful 10-acre property that was at one time a macadamia nut tree farm. The macnuts trees are still there but are not harvested commercially.

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Locally Grown Skin Care Products by Second Skin Naturals

on Friday, 27 December 2013 00:00.

SSN 009Raven C.J. Liddle of Second Skin Naturals in Moloa'a, Kaua'i, harvesting ingredients for her line of skin care products.Second Skin Naturals™ produces beauty and skin care products, including its flagship Hawaiian Jungle Shield Spray, salves, scrubs, masks and rejuvenators, all made from certified organic and locally grown ingredients. The company’s founder Raven C.J. Liddle created the company out of her personal search for high-quality skin products, finding that the market did not supply what she was seeking.

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Joining Forces with Fungi

on Thursday, 21 November 2013 11:13.

Mermel-Shiitake AcaciaKoaLogA partially mature Shiitake mushroom emerges from a koa log.Have you ever accidentally kicked over a log while wandering through a forest, and noticed the white mass of cobweb-like fibers running across the ground? That's mycelium. Only one cell-wall thick, yet capable of supporting more than 30,000 times its own weight, mycelium wend their way through nearly all healthy land-based ecosystems. Given the proper conditions, mushrooms can emerge from these fungal fabrics.

Long marginalized in Western culture, mushrooms are gaining greater recognition for their outstanding benefits to human and ecological health. As keystone organisms, fungi play a primary support role in the recycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and various minerals.

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Grow Grubs! Farming Black Soldier Fly Larvae

on Thursday, 21 November 2013 13:03.

soldierflybinBlack soldier fly bin outside of chicken area.The self-harvesting, antibiotic-excreting, protein-rich larvae of a beneficial insect could be the answer to cutting our dependence on imported animal feed.

Every time a new guest visits our chicken area, they ask about the big orange and purple bin with tubes hanging out the back. “That,” I say proudly, “is our black soldier fly larvarium. Want to see inside?”