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Hawaii Homegrown Food Newsletter 11 - February 2010

on 26 January 2010.

A Project for Hawai'i Island


Together with many other upcoming events, the 6th Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival celebrates connections between Hawaiian culture and agriculture.

Contents

Supporting organizations
Events
Announcements
Reports -- Eat Locally Grown Day; Na'alehu Farmer's Market; What is "Locally Grown" (Part 1)
This month's featured organization: Hawai'i Tropical Fruit Growers Association (HTFG) 
This month's specialty crop: Moringa
Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)
Web resources
Project advisers
Sponsors
Subscriptions
Submissions


Aloha!

As you will see below, local and sustainable food is gearing up in 2010. This is our largest newsletter with more events and activities than ever before. Enjoy!

We welcome our newest Supporting Organization, Hawaii SEED, which promotes diverse, ecological, and healthy local food.

Your submissions are welcome using the form at the bottom of this email or your own announcements. The deadline for the March 2010 newsletter is Tuesday, February 23.

Mahalo nui loa,

Craig Elevitch
Pedro Tama
http://agroforestry.net


Supporting organizations of the Hawai'i Homegrown Food Network

Know Your Farmer Alliance http://www.knowyourfarmeralliance.com
Kona Coffee Farmers Association http://konacoffeefarmers.org
Kona County Farm Bureau http://www.konafarmbureau.org
Kona Outdoor Circle http://www.konaoutdoorcircle.org
North Kohala Food Forum http://nkfoodforum.com
Hawai'i Organic Farmers Association http://www.hawaiiorganic.org
Hawai'i SEED http://www.hawaiiseed.org/
Hawai'i Tea Society http://www.hawaiiteasociety.org/
Hawai'i Tropical Fruit Growers http://www.hawaiitropicalfruitgrowers.org
Slow Food Hawai'i http://www.slowfoodhawaii.org
Sustainable Kohala  http://sustainablekohala.ning.com/

 


Events

Friday, January 29, 10 am - 2:30 pm, North Kona
Event: KCFA Third Annual Trade Expo: Services and Resources Specifically for Small Farms
Sponsor: Kona Coffee Farmers Association (KCFA)
Description: Free and open to all, this is KCFA's annual community service, connecting farmers with the vendors who serve the farmer’s needs! The Trade Expo will features Displays, Product and Service Information, and Technical Talk-story. There will also be a number of educational mini-workshops and presentations, including topics such as the India coffee market, CTAHR projects, Fed Ex discounts, coffee consulting, soil health and analysis, coffee marketing, and organic fertilizer. This is your chance to pick up useful tips to help you farm, and to learn what is going on in our agricultural community. KCFA Annual meeting follows at 3 pm.
Place: Makaeo Pavilion, Old Airport, Kailua-Kona, North Kona
Cost: Free. Door Prizes for KCFA members.
Contact: Marylou, 329-4035, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Monday, February 1, 2:30 - 4:30 pm, Puna
Event: Permaculture Systems Design
Sponsor: La'akea permaculture Hawai'i
Description: Come discover the basics of permaculture design. This class will be an introduction to system design. Please register for this class by 9pm, the night before. Class will start on time.
Location: La'akea Community, Puna (see contact for directions)
Cost: $20
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 443-4076

Wednesday, February 3, 3:30 pm - 5 pm, North Kona
Event: Kona Coffee Talk - Coffee Pruning
Sponsor: The Kona Coffee Farmers Association (KCFA)
Description: KCFA is pleased to announce that the monthly Coffee Talk Meetings formerly held at CTAHR by Virginia Easton-Smith will be continued in her absence by a KCFA education facilitator. The first Coffee Talk topic to be discussed will be coffee pruning with an emphasis on hands-on pruning. The Education Committee of the Kona Coffee Farmers Association (KCFA), a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization, proudly plans to continue this popular monthly series of coffee farming education. Meetings are the first Wednesday of each month.
Place: Bob Nelson's farm, Kainaliu (call contact for directions), North Kona
Cost: Free. The public is welcome!
Contact: 329-4035, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thursday, February 4, 2:30 - 4:30 pm, Puna
Event: Permaculture Systems Design Implementation
Sponsor: La'akea permaculture Hawai'i
Description: If you attended the basics of permaculture design, you are invited to come back, share and implement a common design to be created today. Class will start on time.
Location: La'akea Community, Puna (see contact for directions)
Cost: $20
Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 443-4076

Saturday, February 6, 1:00 - 5:00 pm, Puna
Event: Hawai‘i Grown Tea Propagation
Sponsor: Hawai'i Tea Society
Description: Tea Series I: Workshop with Eva Lee, of Tea Hawaii & Company. The first in a series of two workshops highlighting Hawai‘i as the only state collectively producing domestically grown tea in the United States and what distinguishes tea growing in Hawai‘i from other tea producing countries. This workshop discusses innovations and experimentation by Hawai‘i tea growers to craft a unique tea experience using various known cultivators and propagation methods. Early registration recommended.
Place: Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus, 19-4074 Old Volcano Rd. in Volcano Village. Puna.
Cost: $55 (financial aid available).
Contact: Call (808) 967-8222 or visit http://www.volcanoartcenter.org.

Sunday, February 7, Noon - 6 pm, South Hilo
Event: Annual BobFest Agricultural Fair
Sponsor: Keep it Green Hawaii & Native FM
Description: The BobFest Agricultural Fair 2010 features international reggae artists & local Hawaiian bands. Organic farms and farmers, charter school garden groups, Kona CPR, Sustainable Island Products, CERT Hawai'i and more will be demonstrating & vending.
Place: Mo'oheau Park & Bandstand, Kapiolani St., near Wai'anuenue Ave., Hilo, South Hilo
Cost: Free to the public. (Vendors email Contact)
Contact: Call 808/216-7372, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit http://www.myspace.com/bobfestagfair

Wednesday, February 10, 10 am - noon
Event: "Getting started with a homegrown food oasis"
Sponsor: Kona County Farm Bureau
Description: Craig Elevitch will give a presentation on how to start a homegrown food oasis. The presentation will cover methods of growing diverse crops in an abundant perennial garden.
Place: On the Sheraton Hotel lawn at the intersection with the Keauhou Boat Harbor road.
Cost: Free
Contact: Nancy Pisicchio, Kona County Farm Bureau, 322-3118

Friday - Sunday, February 12 - 14, South Kona
Event: Plant Communication: Reclaiming our Birth-Rite
Sponsor/Organizer: Pati Scamacca
Brief Description: Plant communication through light, sound and breath (call for more details).
Place: Sanctuary of Mana Ke`a Gardens, Honaunau (call for directions), South Kona
Cost: $260
Contact: Pati Scamacca, 328-7306

Saturday, February 13, 9 am - Noon, South Kohala
Event: A Garden Tools Workshop, (First of six workshops in 2nd annual "It Takes a Garden to Grow a Community" series)
Sponsor: Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School
Description: This six-Saturday program will cover a range of topics to help Waimea Middle School students and their families and community friends to start or expand on home food gardens. Gloves and garden tools will be provided for the workshops and participants are urged to bring appropriate weather protection and drinking water. A potluck lunch will follow. The organic Mala'ai school garden includes both traditional Hawaiian food crops such as kalo, mamake and sugarcane, and a far-flung variety of other food and flowering crops and trees.
Place: Mala'ai School Garden at Waimea Middle School, 67-1229 Mamalahoa Hwy, Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: All six classes in series $100. Each class $25. Attendance limited to first 25 who register.
Contact: Patti Cook, 937-2833, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saturday, February 13, 10 am - 11:30 am, South Kona
Event: Free Garden Tour
Sponsor: Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, a Bishop Museum native plant arboretum.
Description: Guided tour of Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden. Learn about native and Polynesian introduced plants and their role and uses in traditional Hawaiian society. Brian Kiyabu, horticulturist, will guide visitors through the 12 acre garden. Visitors can imagine the landscape in the time before Captain Cook, and learn about the productive, sustainable agriculture the Hawaiians were practicing in Kona 300 years ago. No reservations necessary.
Place: Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Gardens, Captain Cook, Mile Marker 110, mauka side of Mamalahoa Highway, South Kona.
Cost: Free (donations are encouraged)
Contact: Call if you have any questions, 323-3318 or e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Monday, February 15, 6:30 pm, North Kona
Event: Hawai'i Tropical Fruit Growers Meeting
Sponsor: HTFG
Description: Topic to be announced
Place: UH Kainaliu Experiment Station, Kainaliu, North Kona
Cost: Free
Contact: Ken Love, 996-7926, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saturday, February 20, South Kona
Event: 4th Annual Hawai'i Avocado Festival
Sponsor/Organizer: Sanctuary of Mana Ke'a Gardens (see website for list of many sponsors)
Description: Featuring live music and entertainment, along with sustainable events including solar powered stage, Eco Village, Green Fashion Show, avocado grafting, growing and organic management, value-added products. Organic foods, fresh fruits, smoothies & kava drinks. There will be presentations by CTAHR, Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, Hawaii Agritourism Association, Recycle Hawai`i, Zero Waste, Friends of NELHA, Green Collar Technologies, One Island Sustainability, SKGM, Hawai'i Homegrown Food Network, HIGI, Hawaii Health Guide, etc. There will be a benefit raffle for Innovations Charter School, and we will continue our special Avocado Recipe Contest, sponsored by the U.H. and local High School Chef Culinary School.
Place: Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, Captain Cook, just south of mile marker 110, mauka side of Mamalahoa Highway, South Kona.
Cost: Free
Contact: Randyl Rupar, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , http://www.manakeasanctuary.org, 808 334-3340

Sunday, February 21, Noon, North Kohala
Event: Slow Food Hawai'i Annual Meeting and Potluck
Sponsor: Slow Food Hawai'i
Description: The business meeting for Slow Food Hawaii members will begin at 11 am, followed at noon by a lunch and open forum for members and nonmembers. Former Mauna Lani executive chef Edwin Goto will offer Hawaiian red veal sliders, and Kona Brew Oceanic Organic Saison beer will be available for tasting. Everyone is asked to bring sides or desserts, and drinks of choice. The forum will feature discussion of North Kohala's food production.
Place: Pu'u O Kumau Ranch (send an email for directions)
Cost: no charge for Slow Food members, $15 per person for nonmembers.
Contact: Shelby Floyd 885-1009, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thursday, February 25, 6 pm, South Hilo
Event: Welcome Dinner for Natural Farming Seminar with Master Cho
Sponsor: see list of Seminar sponsors below at next event (Feb 26 - 28)
Description: A Welcome Dinner to meet and greet Master Cho.
Place: Sky Garden at Imiloa Center, 600 Imiloa St., Hilo, South Hilo
Cost: $25 by February 19. $30 after that. See registration form at http://localgarden.us
Contact: Drake Weinert at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Dwight Sato at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (ph. 345-3464)

Friday - Sunday, February 26 - 28, 9 am - 5 pm, South Hilo
Event: Natural Farming Seminar with Master Cho: A New Wave - In Harmony with Nature
Coordinators and Sponsors: Cho Global Natural Farming-USA, County of Hawai`i-Research and Development, University of Hawai`i College of Agriculture Forestry & Natural Resource Management and College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, Hawai`i Community College Office of Continuing Education & Training, DC Enterprises Ohana LLC, Hamakua Springs., Ka Hana No`eau, a program of the Kohala Intergenerational Center, and Partners In Development Foundation.
Description: Part I: Plant Seminars and Farm Inputs, a 3-day seminar. There is no longer any need to buy chemical fertilizers for the optimum health of your plants. Everything your plants need to thrive exists naturally in our environment and are, literally, at our feet. Natural Farming focuses on living soil and Indigenous Micro-Organisms (IMO’s). IMO’s are the missing link in "organic” farming. They convert organic material into the inorganic minerals and nutrients the plants can utilize. You will learn a completely sustainable system of farming that requires no off-island inputs and provides abundant and nutritious food. Learn how to collect and cultivate Indigenous Micro-Organisms. These ingredients enhance plant growth and you will learn how to apply these inputs in synchronization with the nutritive life cycle of plants.
Cost: $50 by February 19. $75 after that. Lunch each day $8. Special hotel rate available. See registration form at http://localgarden.us
Contact: Drake Weinert at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Dwight Sato at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (ph. 345-3464)

Saturday, February 27, 9 am - 2:30 pm, South Kona
Event: 6th Annual Grow Hawaiian Festival
Sponsor: Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, The Garden is a Bishop Museum native plant arboretum.
Description: At the Festival weavers, dancers, kapa makers, and other practitioners of traditional Hawaiian culture meet biologists, conservationists, and horticulturists to explore their common passion for native and Polynesian introduced plants of Hawai‘i. Festival goers have a unique opportunity to meet and talk with many of the foremost practitioners of Hawaiian arts like weaver Elizabeth Maluihi Lee or lei maker Marie MacDonald. The Grow Hawaiian Festival includes demonstrations, talks, storytelling, hula, plant and insect identification booths, and informational tables from community conservation, cultural, and scientific groups. No reservations necessary.
Place: Amy B. H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Gardens, Captain Cook, Mile Marker 110, mauka side of Mamalahoa Highway, South Kona.
Cost: Free
Contact: Call 323-3318, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , http://www.bishopmuseum.org/greenwell

Saturday, February 27, 9 am - Noon, South Kohala
Event: Composting and Vermiculture (worms), (Second of six workshops in 2nd annual "It Takes a Garden to Grow a Community" series)
Sponsor: Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School
Description: This six-Saturday program will cover a range of topics to help Waimea Middle School students and their families and community friends to start or expand on home food gardens. Gloves and garden tools will be provided for the workshops and participants are urged to bring appropriate weather protection and drinking water. A potluck lunch will follow. The organic Mala’ai school garden includes both traditional Hawaiian food crops such as kalo, mamake and sugarcane, and a far-flung variety of other food and flowering crops and trees.
Place: Mala'ai School Garden at Waimea Middle School, 67-1229 Mamalahoa Hwy, Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: All six classes in series $100. Each class $25. Attendance limited to first 25 who register.
Contact: Patti Cook, 937-2833, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saturday, February 27, 10 am - 12 Noon, South Kohala
Event: Fresh from the Farmers' Market
Sponsor: Waimea Community Education
Description: Food writer and home cook Joan Namkoong shares tips on shopping for produce at the farmers’ market and how to handle and store items to optimize freshness and shelf life. Learn to use fresh items in new ways with some simple recipes for Kale Salad, Roasted Tomatoes, and Red Red Bolognaise featuring Hawai'i Ranchers’ red veal.
Place: Anna Ranch, 65-1480 Kawaihae Rd., Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: $35
Contact: Cathy Youtkus, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , http://www.waimeaeducation.com, (808) 885-1539

Sunday, February 28, 6 - 8 pm, North Kohala
Event: Permaculture and Home Garden Evening
Sponsor: Uluwehi Farm and Permanent Agriculture Resources
Description: Tom Baldwin and Craig Elevitch will present permaculture examples from throughout Hawai‘i and discuss sustainability scenarios within the permaculture context.
Place: The Barn, Hawi
Cost: Free
Contact: Tom Baldwin, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Monday - Tuesday, March 1 - 2, 9 am - 5 pm, South Hilo
Event: Natural Farming Seminar with Master Cho: A New Wave - In Harmony with Nature
Sponsors: Cho Global Natural Farming-USA, County of Hawai`i-Research and Development, University of Hawai`i College of Agriculture Forestry & Natural Resource Management and College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, Hawai`i Community College Office of Continuing Education & Training, DC Enterprises Ohana LLC, Hamakua Springs., Ka Hana No`eau, a program of the Kohala Intergenerational Center, and Partners In Development Foundation.
Description: Part II: Livestock, a 2-day seminar.
Cost: $40 by February 19. $60 after that. Lunch each day $8. Special hotel rate available. See registration form at http://localgarden.us
Contact: Drake Weinert at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Dwight Sato at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (ph. 345-3464)

Wednesday - Thursday, March 3 - 4
Event: Natural Farming Seminar with Master Cho: Farm Tours
Description: East Hawai'i, March 3: Visit a transitional farm with an aquaponic system and a farm utilizing Dr. Cho's method.
West Hawai'i, March 4: Visit Hamakua Springs and University of Nations' natural farm and aquaponic system.
Bring your own lunch.
Cost: $10 by February 19. $15 after that. See registration form at http://localgarden.us
Contact: Drake Weinert at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Dwight Sato at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (ph. 345-3464)

Saturday, March 6, 1:00 - 5:00 pm, Puna
Event: Tea Series II: "Hawai‘i Grown Tea Processing”
Sponsor: Hawai'i Tea Society
Description: Workshop with Eva Lee, of Tea Hawaii & Company. The second in a series of two workshops highlighting Hawai‘i as the only state collectively producing domestically grown tea in the United States and what distinguishes tea growing in Hawai‘i from other tea producing countries. This workshop focuses on traditional as well as not so traditional aspects of tea processing & methods adapted to the Hawai'i Island environment. Early registration recommended.
Place: Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus, 19-4074 Old Volcano Rd. in Volcano Village. Puna.
Cost: $55 (financial aid available).
Contact: Call (808) 967-8222 or visit http://www.volcanoartcenter.org.

Saturday, March 13, 9 am - Noon, South Kohala
Event: Kalo: The Traditional Mo'olelo and Dryland Cultivation, (Third of six workshops in 2nd annual "It Takes a Garden to Grow a Community" series)
Sponsor: Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School
Description: This six-Saturday program will cover a range of topics to help Waimea Middle School students and their families and community friends to start or expand on home food gardens. Gloves and garden tools will be provided for the workshops and participants are urged to bring appropriate weather protection and drinking water. A potluck lunch will follow. The organic Mala’ai school garden includes both traditional Hawaiian food crops such as kalo, mamake and sugarcane, and a far-flung variety of other food and flowering crops and trees.
Place: Mala'ai School Garden at Waimea Middle School, 67-1229 Mamalahoa Hwy, Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: All six classes in series $100. Each class $25. Attendance limited to first 25 who register.
Contact: Patti Cook, 937-2833, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saturday, March 20, 9 am - Noon, South Kohala
Event: Seeds and Saving (also how to plant and transplant), (Fourth of six workshops in 2nd annual "It Takes a Garden to Grow a Community" series)
Sponsor: Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School
Description: This six-Saturday program will cover a range of topics to help Waimea Middle School students and their families and community friends to start or expand on home food gardens. Gloves and garden tools will be provided for the workshops and participants are urged to bring appropriate weather protection and drinking water. A potluck lunch will follow. The organic Mala’ai school garden includes both traditional Hawaiian food crops such as kalo, mamake and sugarcane, and a far-flung variety of other food and flowering crops and trees.
Place: Mala'ai School Garden at Waimea Middle School, 67-1229 Mamalahoa Hwy, Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: All six classes in series $100. Each class $25. Attendance limited to first 25 who register.
Contact: Patti Cook, 937-2833, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. m

Saturday, March 20, Noon - 9 pm, Hamakua
Event: 2010 Spring Film Festival, Honoka'a People's Theatre: Practical Solutions for Sustainable Living
Sponsor: Honoka'a People's Theater, Hamakua Alive!
Description: Media, Films, Keynote Speakers, Information Booths, Food and Music
General topics for this event: Sustainable Agriculture, Food Security and Urban gardening; Peak Oil and Energy Conservation.
Place: Honoka'a Peoples Theater, Honoka'a, Hamakua
Cost: Free
Contact: 775-0000, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , http://www.honokaapeople.com

Friday-Sunday, March 26-28, North Kohala
Event: Homegrown Food Skills Workshop with Craig Elevitch, Tom Baldwin, and others
Sponsors: Uluwehi Farm and Permanent Agriculture Resources
Description: This hands-on workshop covers quick food production, self-reliant soil fertility systems, animal forage systems, food preparation, wild foods, propagation and planting methods, emergency preparedness and more.
Place: The workshop takes place on the active permaculture project at Uluwehi Farm in Hawi.
Cost: $125 before Monday, March 1, $160 thereafter including organic meals and camping
Contact: For more information Tom Baldwin, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; http://uluwehifarm.com

Saturday, March 27, 12 Noon - 3 pm, South Kohala
Event: Thai Curries & Spice
Sponsor: Waimea Community Education
Description: From the southern Indian word “kari” meaning “sauce”, comes the catch-all term for curry, which is quite popular in southeast Asia as well as throughout the entire world. East Indian in origin, curry is a term used to refer to a number of hot, spicy and usually thickened sauce-based dishes. Curry leaf itself is from a plant native to southern Asia. This fragrant herb looks like a small, shiny lemon leaf and has a pungent curry fragrance.
This class will feature a demonstration on making a curry powder using spices, herbs, and seeds which can be easily found on our island. Students are encouraged to bring their own mortar and pestle to make the paste as the next step in the process.
The other portion of the class will feature summer rolls made out of rice paper and stuffed with fresh island ingredients such as lettuce, cilantro, mint, mango and papaya, thin strips of carrot, and cold chicken breast. Dipping sauces will also be featured, including sweet chili, peanut, and citrus soy.
Place: Anna Ranch, 65-1480 Kawaihae Rd., Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: $35
Contact: Cathy Youtkus, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , http://www.waimeaeducation.com, (808) 885-1539.

Saturday & Sunday, April 17-18, 8:30 am–4:30 pm, North Kona
Event: Hua Ka Hua Seed Symposium
Sponsors: Hosted by The Kohala Center through a USDA Organic Research and Education Initiative (OREI) grant.
Description: Farmers and gardeners from around the state are invited to the Hua Ka Hua Seed Symposium to share knowledge of seed growing, selection and saving, and to plan a future public seed initiative. The long-term goal of the symposium is to initiate a Hawai‘i Public Seed Initiative (HPSI) to support on-farm/garden research and expertise in seed variety trials, selection, saving, and storage, and to collaborate with agricultural stakeholders in the development of an open-pollinated organic seed industry for market farmers and home gardeners in Hawai‘i and the Pacific. For program details, speakers, and partners, see http://kohalacenter.org/seedsymposium/about.html.
Place: Outrigger Keauhou Beach Resort, Kahalu‘u Conference Room, Kailua-Kona, North Kona
Cost: $100 by March 1, $150 after March 1 (Cost includes buffet lunch for both days.) To register, see http://www.kohalacenter.org/seedsymposium/registration.html. Special symposium room rate available at Outrigger Keauhou Beach Resort.
Contact: Nancy Redfeather, symposium coordinator, 808-322-2801, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Saturday, April 17, 6 pm - 10 pm, North Kona
Event: 9th Annual Chocolate Festival and Symposium, Festival Gala Event
Sponsors: Na'alehu Theater, Dolphin Journeys, and others.
Description: A multi-day educational experience that brings together pastry Chefs, culinary experts, Chocolatiers, Cacao farmers, regional and national educators, and representatives of the chocolate industry together with families, chocolate mavens and connoisseurs to create a multi-day immersion in "The World of Chocolate." Workshops for cooks, farmers, chocolate lovers, and families are all part of the annual Chocolate Symposium in the Kona Chocolate Festival. Evening Benefit Gala, silent auction, live music, entertainment, sponsor booths, regional chocolate competition, wine, champagne, beer , dancing.
Place: Sheraton Keauhou Bay Resort & Spa, Kailua-Kona, North Kona
Cost: Gala Event - $40; special VIP Sponsors, $125
Contact: Festival phone 9987-8722, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . More info: http://www.konachocolatefestival.com

Saturday, April 24, 9 am - Noon, South Kohala
Event: Cooking From the Garden, (Fifth of six workshops in 2nd annual "It Takes a Garden to Grow a Community" series)
Sponsor: Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School
Description: This six-Saturday program will cover a range of topics to help Waimea Middle School students and their families and community friends to start or expand on home food gardens. Gloves and garden tools will be provided for the workshops and participants are urged to bring appropriate weather protection and drinking water. A potluck lunch will follow. The organic Mala’ai school garden includes both traditional Hawaiian food crops such as kalo, mamake and sugarcane, and many other food and flowering crops and trees.
Place: Mala'ai School Garden at Waimea Middle School, 67-1229 Mamalahoa Hwy, Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: All six classes in series $100. Each class $25. Attendance limited to first 25 who register.
Contact: Patti Cook, 937-2833, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saturday, May 1, 9 am - Noon, South Kohala
Event: Waimea Wed Side/Dry Side Garden Tours, (Last of six workshops in 2nd annual "It Takes a Garden to Grow a Community" series)
Sponsor: Mala'ai, The Culinary Gardens of Waimea Middle School
Description: This six-Saturday program will cover a range of topics to help Waimea Middle School students and their families and community friends to start or expand on home food gardens. Gloves and garden tools will be provided for the workshops and participants are urged to bring appropriate weather protection and drinking water. A potluck lunch will follow. The organic Mala’ai school garden includes both traditional Hawaiian food crops such as kalo, mamake and sugarcane, and many other food and flowering crops and trees.
Place: Mala'ai School Garden at Waimea Middle School, 67-1229 Mamalahoa Hwy, Waimea, South Kohala
Cost: All six classes in series $100. Each class $25. Attendance limited to first 25 who register.
Contact: Patti Cook, 937-2833, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 



Announcements

Hamakua Macadamia Nut Company is purchasing macadamia nuts from Kona farmers. Any farmer can drop their macadamia nuts off at the Marshalling Yard, (current home of the Food Basket/Food bank). They are purchasing nuts for $.60 per pound in husk. They will weigh the nuts, and return your bags to you immediately, on site. They are paying in 30 days. They are there on Mondays and Wednesdays from 7 am - 2 pm. Please tell your friends. Contact: Una Greenaway, President, Kona County Farm Bureau, 328-8888

The Kona Coffee Farmers Association (KCFA) is pleased to announce that the monthly Coffee Talk Monthly Meetings formerly held at CTAHR by Virginia Easton-Smith will be continued in her absence by a KCFA education facilitator. The first Coffee Talk will be held on Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 3:30-5pm, at Bob Nelson's farm in Kainaliu. (Call 329-4035 for directions.) The topic discussed will be Coffee Pruning with an emphasis on hands-on pruning. The Education Committee of the Kona Coffee Farmers Association (KCFA), a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization, proudly plans to continue this popular monthly series of coffee farming education. Meetings are scheduled throughout the year, the first Wednesday of each month 3:30 - 5:00 pm.

Little Fire Ant alert for Kona: The Little Fire Ant has been discovered in Kailua-Kona at a private home site (where they are being "treated") and at a landscaping-business property. A handful of other locations are strongly suspected of infestation. A public meeting about these new infestations is planned the week of February 8, 2010, day and time to be announced (contact Una at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information). Recommended web sites for further information include: http://sites.google.com/site/casvanderwoude/vclconsultingdownloads and http://www.knowyourfarmeralliance.com/critical-issues/little-fire-ant/

Help support organics in Hawaii! HOFA is struggling to survive in this difficult economy - certification fees only pay 75% of administration costs... Please become a member, gift a membership, or donate (tax deductible!) to the Hawaii Organic Farmers Association. 877-ORG-ISLE. See our website at http://www.hawaiiorganic.org (aso see full description of HOFA's outstanding work in our "Organization of the Month" below.

Aloha Avocado Growers: A new University of Hawaii project to identify superior avocados will soon get underway. If you think that you have a high quality avocado and would like to have it evaluated, please send us 3 or 4 fruit picked at the perfect time. If they pass the first test then the project will purchase 20 to 30 of them at $1.00 per lb for further evaluation. At the end of the project we will request scion for grafting in order to protect the variety. Avocados can be brought or sent to Marc Meisner at the UH Kainaliu Experiment Station during business hours or to Ken Love at the Saturday Keauhou Farmers Market. For more information: Ken Love at 323-2417 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Marc Meisner 322-4896

Training: Advanced Study Internship in tropical agroforestry and permaculture by the people who bring you this Hawaii Homegrown Food Network newsletter. The internship is a period of practical, supervised, real-life experience establishing an agroforestry and permaculture food self-reliance project in Holualoa, North Kona. For more information, visit http://www.agroforestry.net/internship/

Eden Earthworks, in Mountain View, Puna, is one of the first three farms in Hawai'i to earn the Animal Welfare Approved seal. The Eden Earthworks Project Fresh: Mountain View Community Gardens, is an agricultural educational program designed to increase the number of food growers, food marketers and healthy food choices. The gardens are located in the heart of the highest food insecure region on Hawaii Island. The Mountain View Gardens is a drug-free and organic farm; a learning environment for families, children, youth and seniors. Mountain View Community Gardens, builds community, provides recreation and plant seeds of hope. Hawaiian squash, Okinawa potatoes, soy bean, spinach, peppers, tomatoes, herbs, celery, kale, green onions, broccoli, taro, yam, eggplants and corn grow like crazy in the community gardens. See http://edenearthworks.org for more information. Hawaii Lowline Cattle Company (Honoka‘a) and Kauai Kunana Dairy are the other two Animal Welfare approved farms. See the Edible Hawaiian Islands blog piece:http://ediblehawaiianislands.blogspot.com/2009/11/animal-welfare-approved-winners.html.

Kula o Mala Community School Garden: We need: Volunteers, plants, seeds, trellis building materials, tools, germination trays, potting mix, positive energy, the sun and the rain. Our Mission: To teach youth how to grow food that is nutritious, delicious, and accessible. Our garden serves more than 320 students from the Hawaii Sustainable Education Initiative, the Honoka'a Elementary School A+ program, the Honoka'a Intermediate School Social Studies and SPED programs, the Hamakua Youth Foundation, and from home school programs. We commit to: Donate at least 40 lbs. a week of produce to the Salvation Army Food Pantry and Honoka'a Senior Nutrition programs. 45-3611 Mamane St. Suite 101-102 Honoka'a HI 96727 Ph: 443-9231 email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Sharing The Wealth of Our Backyards: Have overflowing orange, tangerine, avocado, etc. trees, or runaway zucchini? Urban Farming volunteers in Waimea and Waikoloa will pick or pick up fruits or vegetables from your garden that you wish to share. These will be delivered to the Food Bank. Call Tina Wirth at 887-1087 or email Sue Kilbride at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Kaiao Garden and Kaiao Garden Camp: The name Kaiao means the quality of light at dawn over the ocean. The vision of this garden was simple and profound. Growing food heals our body, mind, and spirit. This community garden from its inception has been devoted to collaboration, education, and community development. As the times we live in are dictating to us the direction we are going if our focus is love and care for each other then we follow the ways of the `aina and those that have lived in this place for thousands of years. We are devoted to the truthful and important dialogue that occurs when diverse cultures participate with each other. Kaiao Garden Camp is a summer day camp for youth. Cost is free for participants. This camp is devoted to exploring kuleana as a community experience of working with the `aina to grow food, friends, and self reflection. We are located on Lahaina Street just up from the Veteran’s Cemetery in Hilo. It is open to everyone on Saturday mornings from 9-12. During the week different schools can come to the garden as part of a class or curriculum. We are also open to community projects and programs having ongoing or single sessions at the garden. Please contact us, we look forward to working with you. http://alohahilo.wordpress.com/kaiao-garden-kaiao-garden-camp/

Mala'ai School Garden Needs you! Whether you like working side-by-side with middle schoolers (they're really a hoot), or prefer solitary gardening, or you are really better at grant writing or recruiting other types of help (sharing seedlings or compost, etc.), or have a particular skill set (composting, vermiculture, building things, teaching how to husk coconuts or prepare an imu), your help is needed and welcome. If you’re inspired to help for whatever reason (nurturing healthier kids, supporting sustainable ag, love quiet time pulling weeds, etc.) please call Mala'ai Executive Director Matilda Tompson (885-9206) or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . School volunteers do undergo background checks and fingerprinting for the safety of all. Of course, if Waimea is a long drive from where you live, there are more than 30 school gardens around the island – all of which would welcome your help. Email Nancy Redfeather of the Hawai'i island School Garden Network to find the garden nearest you: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Friendly Aquaponics, Free Farm Tour every Saturday. Every Saturday at 10am we give a free, in-depth tour of our farm. Tours last between one and two hours, and there is some slightly steep terrain, so come with good walking shoes. Also, make sure to apply sunscreen before your arrival. Make reservations and get directions: http://www.friendlyaquaponics.com/farmtour.html

Hawai'i Tea Society Tea Propagation Program. The Hawai'i Tea Society offers a low-cost local source for high quality Camellia sinensis tea plants for farmers who want to grow a quality sustainable vog-resistant and hardy crop. We have been conducting this program for several years and hope to maintain this as an ongoing program. These plants are all from cuttings from known varieties that have produced very finished teas of the highest quality. Cost: Contact Eva Lee, Propagation Chair, 967-7637, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Reduced rates for members. To join, go to http://www.hawaiiteasociety.com

 

 


Reports

North Kohala Report: Eat Locally Grown Day
By Andrea Dean

Our first North Kohala "Eat Locally Grown Day" was on Saturday, January 16, 2010. This was one of the initiatives that came out of the North Kohala Food Forum <http://www.nkfoodforum.com>. Restaurant owners Joan Channon (Bamboo), Karen Rosen (Kohala Coffee Mill), Peter Pomeranze (Sushi Rock) and farmer Tom Baldwin (Uluwehi Farms) wanted to feature more North Kohala-grown food in our local restaurants to build community consciousness about our healthy, locally produced foods and to create new connections with local farmers.

Well, we did it! Hawi and Kapa’au town were abuzz with local foods from morning to night, from breakfast to dinner, and more. The initial participation grew to include nearly all of our local restaurants and markets -- Bamboo, Sushi Rock, Kohala Coffee Mill, Luke’s Place, Kava Kafe, Pico’s, Fig’s Mixed Plate, Snack Shack, Hawi Farmers Market, Takata’s -- all of whom rocked with local food, drinks, and music! The North Kohala Eat Locally Grown Day started early at the Kohala Coffee Mill and the Hawi Farmers’ Market and ended late with local kava and local music at the Kava Cafe and Studio 54 at Sushi Rock! We ate, we danced, we raised awareness about local food and farmers!

Andrea Dean (right) interviews restaurant owner Karen Rosen on "Eat Locally Grown Day." See more photos: http://www.andreadean.com/blog/2010/01/18/north-kohala-eat-locally-grown-day/ Watch the videos: http://www.andreadean.com/blog/2010/01/19/video-clips-north-kohala-eat-locally-grown-day/


Ka'u Report: The Na'alehu Farmers Market
Story and photos by India Young

If you happen to be in Na`alehu on a Wednesday or Saturday morning, a stop at the Ka`u Farmers’ Market is a must. The small community market is run by the non-profit organization Ka`u Mainstreet, and has been going strong for 8 years. “It all began on the first Saturday in December, 2001, when the Main Street Board met with four local farmers and arranged to set up stalls in Wai`ohinu park,” said Ka`u Mainstreet president Marge Elwell. Since then, the market moved to the Na`alehu Theatre, and is now held in front of Ace Hardware at 95-5656 Mamalahoa Hwy. Market hours are 8:00 a.m. to noon. “You’ll find the very freshest direct-from-the-farm fruits, vegetables, macadamia nuts and coffee…along with hot-from-the-oven baked goods,” said Elwell. “In addition, you will find local crafts, art, plants and an assortment of other Ka`u specialties.” Currently there are anywhere from 15 – 25 vendors on any given market day. Local products include: raw Ka`u honey, Ka`u coffee, free-range Ka`u beef, free-range eggs, fruits, vegetables, homemade bread, baked goods and desserts made with local ingredients, and nursery plants.

Market manager Eleanor Powell said “We’re like a family here--everyone watches out for everyone else. I’m very proud of all my vendors, their abilities, craftsmanship, and excellent produce,” said Powell. “The Ka`u Farmers Market is a gathering place for locals and visitors alike...all looking for great food, great prices, and lots of fun!” said Elwell. On Wednesdays, shoppers wait in line as early as 7:30 a.m. to stock up on their weekly fresh vegetables and fruit from Hester Farms. Farmers Ellis and Sokha Hester’s produce usually sells out by 9:30 a.m. Some fresh harvested favorites include: eggplant, carrots, corn, zucchini, squash, pumpkin, cauliflower, greens, tomatoes, peppers, pineapple, raspberries, herbs, and flowers. Hester Farms’ produce is grown on 30 acres of their 200 acre agricultural property, 1 mile above Pahala. Ellis’s wife Sokha said that Ellis, who is from Grand Island in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, has been farming “since he was in his mother’s stomach”. Ellis also said that he was born with a talent for farming and that “if you like something and work hard it will always support you”. He added that farming is job security because there’s always something to do. He said he will give tours of his farm and would even train an apprentice, “If you find me someone with initiative, who wants to learn, I’ll teach them.”

Michelle Galimba, who sells Ka`u free-range beef raised on her family’s 40 year old Kuahiwi Ranch, is at the market on Wednesdays. The cows are grass fed with some grain supplements, and slaughtered and processed in Hilo, she said. “What’s most rewarding about being a rancher is being able to raise local food and improve the environment through conservation,” she said.

Long after closing and late into the afternoon, there is one vendor who is still at the market, Mrs. Mele Akau. The Pahala native sets up early and stays all day until 5 p.m. Mele offers a range of produce and flowers, and sells her homegrown taro, bananas, papayas, avocados, tangerines, greens, pineapples, and squashes. You’ll know it’s Mele by her “Hello, what today?” greeting and enthusiastic smile.

Anyone interested in vending at the Ka`u Farmers’ Market must first become a member of Ka`u Mainstreet and pay the annual membership fee of $10, which includes market insurance. Then, call Eleanor Powell at 939-7536 before 6:30 p.m., a couple of days before market to let her know you want to participate. Vendors should bring their own canopy, tables, and chairs.

 


Mele Akau and helper Marilu are all smiles on market day.


Sokha Hester selling fresh veggies from Hester Farms


What is “Locally Grown”? Part 1: Infrastructure

By Craig Elevitch, Agroforestry Net

What it takes to grow a “locally grown” crop is more than just a geographical location. "Local" also applies to the resources that go into the crop’s production and distribution. These two tomatoes were both grown on Hawai‘i Island, but one was grown using a vast amount of off-island infrastructure and imported resources and the other relied only on local and sustainably produced resources.

The tomato on the left (15% local) was grown by a large commercial operation using imported synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. These inputs require large quantities of fuel, minerals, and chemicals to produce and transport them. The seed used to grow the plants was imported from a large mainland seed company. The variety might be patented, which means that the seed cannot be legally saved for the next season. Irrigation water was pumped out of the ground, requiring an expensive water infrastructure and imported energy to drive pumps. Also, because the left-hand tomato is grown on a large farm, it requires fossil fuel, vehicles, and many miles of road to transport it to the consumer.

The tomato on the right (100% local) was fertilized using compost and mulch made with organic materials grown where the tomato was grown. In other words, the fertilizers required no imports. This variety has been grown in the same garden for 15 years so it has become locally acclimatized to a specific environment. The seed was saved from last year’s crop—it is not patented and therefore is not owned by anyone. Rainwater was used to irrigate the plants, either directly from the sky or from a catchment tank when necessary. Maintaining thick organic mulch on top of the soil minimizes water and nutrient losses. Finally, the tomato is consumed by the people who grew it and surplus tomatoes given to neighbors or sold in the local farmer’s market.


The infrastructure used in producing “locally grown” crops determines whether our food system is self-reliant or sustainable. The 15% local tomato requires continuous reliance on farm inputs from outside Hawai‘i, and results in a large carbon footprint. The 100% local tomato can be replicated in any garden or farm in Hawai‘i and minimizes detrimental impacts on the environment.

 


This month's featured Hawai'i Island organization 

 

Hawai'i Tropical Fruit Growers (HTFG) http://www.hawaiitropicalfruitgrowers.org

 

Hawai'i Tropical Fruit Growers is a nonprofit organization, incorporated in 1989, with the primary purpose of promoting the interests of any and all aspects of tropical fruit in the State of Hawai'i. HTFG is dedicated to tropical fruit research, education, marketing and promotion.


Research: Advancement of Hawaii's tropical fruit industry through research is the heart of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers. HTFG funds and participates in studies to improve cultural practices and postharvest treatments. Research recently completed includes development of value-added products from off-grade tropical fruit.With our research grants, we work in close partnership with the University of Hawai'i College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), and the USDA-ARS Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (PBARC).


Education: The annual International Tropical Fruit Conference each fall serves as the focal point of information dissemination and training for the industry. The far-reaching and timely topics highlight new research, industry news, and trends. Featured speakers are tropical fruit experts from around the world. Now in its fifteenth year, the popular conference also features orchard tours and demonstrations, fruit tasting, and a benefit auction. Chapter workshops and seminars held throughout the year present important issues and informative speakers. These meetings are a great venue for the exchange of knowledge and experience. HTFG organizes tours to international research symposiums. Past tours visited Australia and Thailand. Members receive a subscription to Agriculture Hawaii magazine.


Promotion: HTFG promotes tropical fruits and our members at trade shows, food festivals and industry events. We bring in fresh, delicious, unusual fruits for demonstrations on preparing and enjoying. It is rewarding and fun to watch the participants get excited over their new fruit discoveries. Our West Hawaii Chapter recently introduced tropical fruit posters and cards to promote Hawaii's many tropical fruit varieties to chefs, retailers and consumers. Commercial Grower members receive exposure through HTFG's Commercial Directory, distributed to fruit industry professionals interested in purchasing fruit, trees or value-added products.


Representation:
HTFG participates in the Hawai'i Farm Bureau's Commodity Advisory Group, representing the interests of the tropical fruit industry and coordinating state level efforts to benefit Hawai'i agriculture.


The Hawaii tropical fruit industry is growing rapidly, especially on the Big Island. Our membership includes people who work in many aspects of this business: small growers and commercial growers, nursery stock growers of tropical fruit trees, packers and wholesalers, and manufacturers of tropical fruit specialty products. The majority of HTFG members farm on the island of Hawai'i and we have three active chapters here. They are the East Hawai'i Chapter, the West Hawai'i Chapter and the Cacao Chapter.

Contact information
Ken Love
PO Box 1162
Captain Cook, HI 96704
Phone: 808-996-7926
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web site: http://www.hawaiitropicalfruitgrowers.org

 


 

This month's specialty crop: Moringa

By Dr. Ted Radovich

Almost all parts of the moringa tree are used for food, oil, fiber, and/or medicine. In the Pacific, the most important products are pods and leaves. Young pods are consumed as a vegetable. Very young pods are fiberless, and can be cooked like string beans. Because the weight is low on very young pods, most commercial production involves larger, more fibrous pods that are used in soups, stews, and curries. The nutritious leaves are eaten in many dishes including soups, stews, and stir fries. Sauteed young leaves and flowers are also eaten. The demand for home consumption of pods and leaves can generally be met by one or two backyard trees.

Commercial production of mature seeds for oil occurs in India, Africa, and elsewhere. The press cake left over after extracting seed oil is utilized as a fertilizer and as a flocculent for water clarification. The seed cake contains positively charged compounds that are effective in settling suspended solids out of water (flocculation) because most particles have a net negative surface charge while suspended in aqueous solution. There is international interest in using moringa-based flocculants as a locally produced, biodegradable substitute for aluminum sulfate, which is commonly used to clarify water. The seed cake is normally not used as livestock feed because of the presence of antinutritional compounds in the mature seeds.

Leaves are readily eaten by cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, chickens and rabbits and can also be used as food for fish. Several studies demonstrate that significant proportions of traditional fodder can be replaced with moringa leaf.

Most parts of the plant are used as a medicine. The greatest contribution of moringa to health is its high nutritional value. The most common direct medical use of the plant is as poultice of the leaves and bark applied directly to wounds as an anti-microbial and to promote healing. The anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties of moringa extracts are well documented and are thought to be derived at least in part from 4-(α-L-rhamnopy-ranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate. This compound is particularly effective against Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen of human beings in medically underserved areas and poor populations worldwide. The strong tradition of medical uses of moringa combined with recent scientific work supporting these traditions has resulted in increased marketing of supplements and so-called “superfoods” based on moringa.

This introduction was excerpted from the full 12-page publication: Radovich, T. 2009. Farm and Forestry Production and Marketing Profile for Moringa (Moringa oleifera). In: Elevitch, C.R. (ed.). Specialty Crops for Pacific Island Agroforestry. Permanent Agriculture Resources (PAR), Holualoa, Hawai‘i. Download this pdf file at: http://agroforestry.net/scps


Because of its many uses and services, moringa is known as a "miracle tree" around the world.


Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

North Kohala

    Uluwehi Farm (Hawi) 889-1081

South Kohala 

    Ka`Ohi Nani Farm (Waimea)  885-1950  

Hamakua

     Hawai'i Sustainable Education Initiative (HSEI) & Friendly Aquaponics (Honoka'a)   443-9231 

Puna

    Polestar Gardens (Pahoa) 430-8009
Ginger Ridge Farms (Mountain View)  968-7622
  Milk and Honey Farm (Pahoa)   345-4401
    Dragon's Eye CSA (Kapoho)   965-9371

South Kona

    Adaptations (Captain Cook)  324-6600

Ka'u

    West Hawaii Farms (Oceanview)  939-9701

Community Gardens

Eden Earthworks Community Garden, Mountain View http://www.edenearthworks.org
Kaiao, Hilo, South Hilo http://alohahilo.wordpress.com/kaiao-garden-kaiao-garden-camp/


Web resources

This month's new web resources

* Efficient Water Use in Garden Agriculture http://www.holmgren.com.au/DLFiles/PDFs/WaterJournalOpWeb.pdf
* Hawai'i 24/7-Agriculture http://www.hawaii247.org/category/agriculture/
* Non-GMO Products/Retailers http://www.nongmoproject.org/consumers/search-participating-products/
* North Kohala Eat Local Day - Videos http://www.andreadean.com/blog/2010/01/19/video-clips-north-kohala-eat-locally-grown-day/

Hawai'i organizations

Agroforestry Net http://www.agroforestry.net
Eden Earthworks Community Garden http://www.edenearthworks.org
Hawai'i Agriculture Notes http://www.ahualoa.net/ag/notes_farming.html
Hawai'i Ag Tourism Assn http://hiagtourism.org
Hawai'i Farmers Union http://www.hawaiifarmersunion.org
Hawai'i Fruit http://www.Hawaiifruit.net
Hawai'i Island School Garden Network http://www.kohalacenter.org/HISGN/about.html
Hawai'i Natural Farmers  http://www.localgarden.us/
Hawai'i Organic Farmers Association http://www.hawaiiorganic.org
Hawai'i SEED http://www.hawaiiseed.org
Hawai'i Tea Society http://www.hawaiiteasociety.org/
Hawai'i Tropical Fruit Growers http://www.hawaiitropicalfruitgrowers.org
Kaiao Garden & Garden Camp http://alohahilo.wordpress.com/kaiao-garden-kaiao-garden-camp/
Know Your Farmer Alliance http://www.knowyourfarmeralliance.com
Kona Coffee Farmers Association http://www.konacoffeefarmers.org
Kona County Farm Bureau http://www.konafarmbureau.org
Kona Outdoor Circle http://www.konaoutdoorcircle.org
Mala'ai Culinary Gardens http://www.malaai.org
North Kohala Food Forum http://nkfoodforum.com
Slow Food Hawai'i http://www.slowfoodhawaii.org
Sheep and Goat Producers http://sites.google.com/site/hawaiisheepandgoatassociation
Sustainable Hawaii http://sustainablehawaiiisland.org/
Sustainable Kohala  http://sustainablekohala.ning.com/
Waimea Outdoor Circle http://www.waimeaoutdoorcircle.org

Other Hawai'i Island websites

Andrea Dean Eat Local http://www.andreadean.com
Big Island Farmers Markets http://www.hcrs.info/sustainability/agriculture-and-food
Green Hawaii http://www.greenhawaii.com
Hawai'i Community Stewardship Directory http://hawaii.gov/dbedt/czm/initiative/community_based/CommunityStewardshipDirectory.pdf
Hawai'i Invasive Species http://www.hawaiiinvasivespecies.org/
Hawai'i Physical Activity and Nutrition Newsletter http://www.healthyhawaii.com
How to Feed Chickens in Hawaii http://www.ahualoa.net/chickens/
Kaua'i Community College: Growing Food Seminars http://groups.google.com/group/koloadistrictgardeners/web/training-resouce-manual?pli=1
La'akea Permaculture Community http://http://permaculture-hawaii.com
Organic Seeds  http://www.hawaiiorganic.org/resources/seeds 
Plants Hawaii http://www.plantshawaii.com
South Kona Green Market http://www.skgm.org

University of Hawai’i College of Tropical Agriculture (CTAHR)

CTAHR Sustainable Ag Newsletter http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/sustainag/news/
Organic - CTAHR http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/organic/
Overview of Organic Food Crop Systems in Hawai'i http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/SA-3.pdf
Buy Fresh - Buy Local http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/sustainag/BFBL.asp
Sustainable - CTAHR http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/sustainag/index.asp 
Hawaii County --Extension & Research http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/ctahr2001/Counties/HawaiiCounty/index.html
Sustainable Animal Production  http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/sustainag/NewFarmer/Animal.asp
Using Perennial Peanut as Living Mulch for Fruit Trees in Hawai'i http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/SCM-27.pdf
Poultry Grazing System for Egg Production  http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/LM-20.pdf

Agroforestry Net

Agroforestry Net http://www.agroforestry.net
Growing a complete diet in the tropics http://www.agroforestry.net/pubs/Can_I_Grow_a_Complete_Diet.pdf
Growing Black Pepper in Hawai'i http://agroforestry.net/scps/Black_pepper_specialty_crop.pdf
Growing Kava in Hawai'i http://agroforestry.net/scps/Kava_specialty_crop.pdf
The Hawai‘i Island Homegrown: Start-up guide for an organic self-reliance garden http://www.agroforestry.net/pubs
Shade-Grown Coffee in Kona http://www.agroforestry.net/caf/Hawaii_shade_coffee.pdf

Government agencies

Hawaii County Resource Center http://www.hcrc.info/sustainability/agriculture-and-food

National websites  

ACRES, sustainable farming magazine http://www.acresusa.com/magazines/magazine.htm
ATTRA organic farming resources http://attra.ncat.org/organic.html
BALLE food networks http://www.livingeconomies.org/entrepreneurs/sustainable-agriculture
Bee Colony Collapse: What We Know Now  http://roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/02/saving-bees-what-we-know-now/?emc=eta1
Biodynamic Certification  http://demeter-usa.org/
Biodynamic Farming & Gardening  http://www.biodynamics.com/
Community Alliance with Family Farmers http://caff.org
Cheese making  http://smalldairy.com/
Columbia Gorge Food Network  http://www.gorgegrown.com/
Community Food Security Coalition http://www.foodsecurity.org
Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund  http://www.farmtoconsumer.org/
Food & Water Watch  http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/food
Food Declaration http://fooddeclaration.org
Food Share http://www.foodshare.net
GMO Watch  http://www.gmwatch.org/
GMO shoppers guide  http://www.geaction.org/truefood/shoppersguide/guide_printable.html
GRAIN - small farm community control   http://www.grain.org/about/?org
Growing Power http://www.growingpower.org
Local Harvest - Organic http://www.localharvest.org
National Homegrown Site http://www.homegrown.org
National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition  http://sustainableagriculture.net/
Natural Farming http://janonglove.com/janongusa/intro01.html
Organic Consumers Association http://www.organicconsumers.org
Organic Farming Research Foundation  http://ofrf.org/index.html
Organic Trade Association http://www.organicitsworthit.org/about
Organizing A Community Garden  http://www.umext.maine.edu/onlinepubs/htmpubs/4300.htm
Permaculture Activist http://permacultureactivist.net/index.html
Radio Stations about Healthy Food  http://www.mnn.com/food/farms-gardens/stories/top-11-green-food-radio-shows#
Restoring a Rainforest http://www.ted.com/talks/willie_smits_restores_a_rainforest.html
The Rodale Institute http://www.rodaleinstitute.org/
Start a Community Garden http://www.communitygarden.org/learn/starting-a-community-garden.php
True Cost of Food - Quiz http://www.thegreenguide.com/food/buying/sustainable-food-quiz
USDA-National Organic Program http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/nop
Young Farmers Network http://www.thegreenhorns.net
Your Home Carbon Footprint Calculator http://www.nature.org/initiatives/climatechange/calculator/?src=f1

Videos

Hawai'i Farmer & Chef videos http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=HawaiiFarmerChef&search_type=&aq

Islands at Risk - Genetic Engineering in Hawai'i  http://farmwars.info/?p=457

Videos about producing quality tropical fruit www.Hawaiifruit.net

North Kohala Food Forum
http://www.nkfoodforum.com/profiles/blogs/north-kohala-food-forum-video

Permaculture - farms for the future  http://www.viddler.com/explore/PermaScience/videos/4/ 

Food, Inc. movie trailer http://www.foodincmovie.com/

The Future of Food (film)   http://www.thefutureoffood.com/

Priceless  movie trailer  http://habitatmedia.org/summit6.html                

The Real Dirt on Farmer John (trailer) http://www.metacafe.com/watch/600284/the_real_dirt_on_farmer_john_trailer/


Project advisers

Amanda Rieux, teacher at Mala ‘Ai Culinary Garden at Waimea Middle School
Andrea Dean, sustainability consultant andreadean.com and local foods advocate, North Kohala
Bruce Mathews, professor of Soil Science, UH Hilo
Deborah Ward, retired UH CTAHR extension agent and farmer, Kea‘au
Geoff Rauch, director of Know Your Farmer Alliance and farmer, Kapoho
Hector Valenzuela, vegetable crops extension specialist, UH Manoa
Jerry Konanui, mahi 'ai and educator, Pahoa
Joe Kassel, naturopathic physician and farmer, Holualoa
Ken Love, tropical fruit horticulture and marketing specialist, Captain Cook
Lyn Howe, director of Know Your Farmer Alliance and farmer, Kapoho
Mary Lynn Garner, Konawaena High School teacher and farmer, Kealakekua
Nancy Miller, marketing specialist and manager of Keauhou Farmers’ Market
Roen & Ken Hufford, Honopua Farm, managers, Hawaiian Homestead Farmers Market, Waimea
Ted Radovich, crop specialist, Sustainable Farming Systems Laboratory, UH Manoa

 

 

 

Sponsors

Hawai‘i County Resource Center , a program of the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research and Development

Hawaii Agricultural Development Program in partnership with the Big Island RC&D Council. WSARE logo

Hawai'i People's Fund and the Hawai'i Community Foundation

Agroforestry Net